Associated Content Tip of the Day 24 March 2007: Creating Bullets


The Associated Content editor does not contain a bullet maker when you are creating your article. The safest way to create a bulleted list at AC is to use some basic HTML. It’s not hard. Just remember to close all your tags and everything will look fine.

In HTML you have two choices for the list you want to create, ordered or unordered. An ordered list will create numbers starting at 1 and increasing for each bullet. HTML will track the numbers automatically. If you add a bullet to the middle of the list, all the following numbers will increment.

An unordered list will create simple bullets. The web site’s style sheet will determine what the bullet looks like. Your article preview may show simple circles, but once published they may change to arrows or whatever AC defines as a bullet.

To create an ordered or numbered list, use the OL tag. For an unordered or bullet list, use the UL tag. Within each OL or UL block, designate your bullet with the LI tag. HTML tags are denoted by using the less-than (<) and greater-than (>) keys. Every HTML tag needs an open and close point. To open a tag type “<tag>”. To close the tag type “</tag>”.

Here is an example of an ordered list:

  1. This is point number 1
  2. Here is number two
  3. Hehe, I just said “number two”
  4. Now you know the basics

The code for that list is
<ol>
<li>This is point number 1</li>
<li>Here is number two</li>
<li>Hehe, I just said “number two”</li>
<li>Now you know the basics</li>
</ol>

Here is an example of an unordered list:

  • With a bullet
  • From a gun
  • Made you look
  • Made you run

The code for that list is
<ul>
<li>With a bullet</li>
<li>From a gun</li>
<li>Made you look</li>
<li>Made you run</li>
</ul>

One word of caution
Once your article is published at AC your bullets may be partially hidden by some of the other columns of the AC layout. This is true of lists that appear at the top of your article’s page. They tend to be hidden by the picture and/or takeaways. If you rely heavily on lists in your article, consider not including a picture, fun fact, and takeaways. This allows more space for your text and more room for you bullets to shine.

Advertisements

One Comment

Add yours →

  1. I’m still learning XHTML/HTML but love it! Hopefully I will have some time coming up to get creative with my blog.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: